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Session on January 7th has been postponed to February 4th due to the snow storm! No session on 1/7.

What Matters Most | Starting the Conversation About Your Wishes for Care

Talking about our wishes for care through the end of life feels important, like it’s something we should do. Yet we avoid having these conversations—largely because we don’t know how to start talking about what matters most to us. For an in-depth experience exploring what matters most to you about living well through the end of your life, register for a 2-part interactive workshop led by Rosemary Lloyd.

In Person Dates
Sundays, February 4 (second date TBD), from 4:00-5:30pm | REGISTER HERE
(If you registered for our in person sessions previously you do not have to re-register. If you are no longer able to attend please contact sarah@fplincoln.org)

Online Only Dates
Sundays, January 14 and February 11, from 4:00-5:30pm | REGISTER HERE

In two, 90-minute workshops, you will

  • reflect on what matters most to you
  • begin articulating your wishes for care that are aligned with your values
  • learn why choosing a health care proxy (someone who would make decisions for you if you couldn’t speak for yourself) is essential
  • receive guidance on how to choose the right person to be your health care proxy
  • get support and encouragement to begin having these meaningful conversations to communicate your wishes for care to the people who matter most to you.

(WATCH ROSEMARY’S INTRODUCTORY FORUM HERE.)

About Rosemary

The Rev. Rosemary Lloyd has a life-long interest in end-of-life care and ethics that are fueled by her experience as a registered nurse, hospice volunteer, minister, and family caregiver. She is a graduate of Georgetown University, Harvard Divinity School, and the Metta Institute for Compassionate End of Life Care led by Frank Ostaseski, co-founder of the San Francisco Zen Hospice House and author of The Five Invitations. An ordained Unitarian Universalist minister, she has led classes on aging and end-of-life choices for 20 years.

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